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Essential Shaping

41m 46s • {categories show="1458|1456|1459" limit="1"}{category_name}{/categories} • 11 lessons

Shaping is the art of increasing and decreasing stitches to create a shaped piece of knitting. From socks and sleeves, to teddy bears and bobble hats, shaping is essential to move from the simple square to a beautiful garment or toy.

Course created by

Neti Love & Julie Peasgood

Shaping is the art of increasing and decreasing stitches to create a shaped piece of knitting. From socks and sleeves, to teddy bears and bobble hats, shaping is essential to move from the simple square to a beautiful garment or toy.

Read More Begin this course
Essential Shaping

Course Overview

Price

Price

Included with Let’s Knit Together membership

Instructor

Instructor

Neti Love & Julie Peasgood

Duration

Duration

41m 46s

Lessons

Lessons

11

Difficulty

Difficulty

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What you need

What you need

A pair of straight, single-pointed knitting needles; a ball of yarn

Course Lessons ( 11 )

  • 1. How to: increase a knit stitch (m1)

    05:35

    When you see m1 in a pattern, this is asking you to increase your stitch count by one stitch. It is a left-leaning increase in stocking stitch, and is worked using the horizontal bar between stitches.

  • 2. How to: increase a knit stitch (kfb)

    07:17

    In a pattern, kfb stands for 'knit into the front and back of the same stitch' and adds one stitch to your needle. This may leave a small bar, depending on your pattern.

  • 3. How to: decrease knit stitches (k2tog)

    04:28

    To reduce the number of stitches on a knit row, pulling the shaping in to the right, you'll often see 'k2tog' towards the end of pattern row. This means 'knit 2 stitches together' as one.

  • 4. How to: decrease knit stitches (ssk)

    02:31

    Ssk is a knitting abbreviation that stands for ‘slip, slip, knit’, which is a way to decrease the number of knit stitches on a row. This will pull the overall shaping to the left.

  • 5. How to: decrease purl stitches (p2tog)

    03:44

    To decrease purl stitches, you may see pattern p2tog as an abbreviation meaning to purl two stitches together. This creates a right-leaning decrease on the front of stocking stitch fabric.

  • 6. How to: decrease purl stitches (p2tog tbl)

    04:46

    To decrease purl stitches for left-leaning shaping, you can work p2tog tbl to work two stitches together through the back loop. Be sure to start from behind the second stitch to work this decrease.

  • 7. How to: increase a purl stitch (pfb)

    05:25

    Pfb in a pattern means to work into the front and back of a purl stitch. This increases your number of stitches by one when working on a purl row or set of purl pattern stitches.

  • 8. How to: decrease a knit stitch (skpo)

    04:07

    SKPO is a left-leaning decrease worked over knit stitches, so usually on the right side, and it’s all in the name! Just Slip, Knit, Pass the slipped stitch Over – and you’re done.

  • 9. How to: increase a purl stitch (m1p)

    03:35

    Increase a stitch on the purl side of your knitting by picking up the horizontal loop between stitches and purl into the back of it for a left-leaning increase on the right side.

  • 10. How to: work a central double decrease stitch (cdc)

    3:49

    This decrease creates a neat decrease that doesn’t produce a slant to the left or the right. This means it’s useful for producing small tucks within a row, as opposed to other decreases like k2tog and skpo that help to shape edges.

  • 11. Make a Simple Christmas Bauble

    10:14

    If you can knit in stocking stitch, you can make a bauble! Being able to knit a simple ball shape is a great way to practise simple increasing and decreasing stitches, and here we show how it is done with a flat piece of knitting that is simply worked in rows, then sewn up.

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